Items Tagged with 'Iowa State University'

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[Podcast] Setting Up Your Strip-Till Rig for an Ideal Seedbed

In this episode of the <em>Strip-Till Farmer</em> podcast, brought to you by Blu-Jet, we welcome Iowa State University ag engineer, Mark Hanna, to share his insight on the interaction between strip-till equipment and other machinery to manipulate soils, manage residue and band fertilizer.
In this episode of the Strip-Till Farmer podcast, brought to you by Blu-Jet, we welcome Iowa State University ag engineer Mark Hanna to share his insight on the interaction between strip-till equipment and other machinery to manipulate soils, manage residue and band fertilizer.
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Video: Well-Rounded Benefits of a Strip-Till System

Mahdi Al-Kaisi, assistant professor department of agronomy at Iowa State University, discusses the benefits of strip-till vs. conventional tillage practices, to include better water infiltration, residue cover, soil-warming effects and minimized nutrient deficiency. He also discusses how a complete system can positively impact plant emergence and crop yields.
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What Is Soil Health And How Can We Improve It?

The term soil health is used interchangeably with soil quality, but in this article I prefer the use of soil health because it is a more appropriate term in defining soil functions as a living and dynamic natural system. Soil health is a condition, or status, of the soil at a certain place and in a specific environment as compared to a certain reference or benchmark condition. However, the concept of soil health can vary in use based on the priorities placed on different soil functions. Therefore, the concept of soil health should be understood within the context and intention of the users of the soil health term, their goal and the boundaries in which they are working.


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Importance of Planting Depth in Corn

One of my biggest pet peeves when it comes to crop production is shallow planting. Adoption of no-till and strip till farming practices is on the increase. The biggest issue that comes with those practices is uneven planting depths. The importance of correct planting depth is sometimes over shadowed by the spacing. But, in my eyes, if the depth is not correct then spacing means nothing. Iowa State University says that optimum planting depths for corn should be 1.75 to 2.25 inches, with the optimum being 2.0 inches. I prefer 2.25 inches as the depth to shoot for. One should not see more then about a .25 inch variance either way when checking the planter across a field.
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