Dan Crummett

Dan Crummett

Dan Crummett has more than 35 years in regional and national agricultural journalism including editing state farm magazines, web-based machinery reporting and has an interest in no-till and conservation tillage. He holds B.S. and M.S. degrees from Oklahoma State Univ.

ARTICLES

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Pros & Cons of Coulters, Shanks & Knives

A longtime crop consultant and OEM equipment marketer-turned-manufacturer lays out the basics of strip-till ground-engaging tool designs and how to choose the best for your needs.

Bill Preller says hard economics as well as other factors are quickly moving strip-till from fad to mainstream with U.S. farmers.


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Slashing Fuel Costs and Field Passes with Strip-Till

Southern California grower Tom Barcellos experienced a “blessing in disguise” when a tractor breakdown at planting time pushed him to switch from conventional tillage to no-till and later to strip-till.
Until 2000, Tom Barcellos was a conventional farmer like all of his neighbors in Tulare County in south-central California. 


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Prospering from a Green and Growing Approach on Every Acre

Precise placement, intensive soil-sampling and cover crop experiments help cut New York strip-tiller Donn Branton’s fertilizer rates in half and significantly boost corn yields over 40-year career.
Precise placement, intensive soil-sampling and cover crop experiments help cut New York strip-tiller Donn Branton’s fertilizer rates in half and significantly boost corn yields over 40-year career.
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Resourceful Management Reaps Strip-Till Benefits

Relying on equipment sharing and an agronomic eye, in 4 years of strip-tilling Justin Krell has cut fertilizer use by 30% and achieved 230-bushel corn.
Justin Krell says he started strip-tilling in 2017 mainly to make better use of his time and money — both important factors considering he’s trying to expand his farm while also working full-time as an agronomist for a seed corn company. 
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Adding Up Strip-Till Benefits Equals Measurable Yield Gains, Nutrient Efficiency

After 20 years of strip-till, Nebraska’s Scott Bussell has proven effective in saving soil, moisture, time and labor, while enabling more efficient use of applied nutrients.
Scott Bussell says there’s a big difference in maximum production and optimum production when it comes to his farm’s bottom line, and he credits 20 years of strip-till management for helping him take advantage of that difference.
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Strip-Till Viable on Both Ends of Cross-Country Farm Move

Texas corn producers move their farm 1,300 miles east and pick up where they left off when their High Plains strip-till operation was displaced by a growing dairy. The sand’s the same in South Carolina.
It’s rare when a farm gets bought out that the owner moves half way across the country just to start again. That’s what brothers Brandon and Colt Woody did, after some serious, careful planning.
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Surviving & Thriving with Minimal Moisture Strip-Till

Strip-till counteracts prolonged drought conditions on a 17,000-acre operation, reduces fuel and labor costs by $80 per acre while producing 275 bushel corn yields.
During California's devastating 2012-15 drought, many Central Valley growers depending on surface water to irrigate crops were forced to cut planted acres — and potential income — by up to 50%.
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Stretching Strip-Till Value with Crop Diversity, Cover Crop Height

A quarter-century of strip-till for Georgia grower Barry Martin complements shoulder-high cereal rye cover crops in peanuts and cotton to reduce erosion, boost organic matter and simplify planting.
Barry Martin was completely convinced of the benefits of a heavy cereal rye cover crop on his cotton and peanut farm near Hawkinsville in central Georgia long before cover crops were the rage.
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Clearing Out the Equipment Shed with a Switch to Strip-Till

Illinois grower Craig Taylor uses strip-till, custom services and cover crops to achieve competitive yields using less labor and machinery, while also catching more rainfall and building soil organic matter.
When Craig Taylor decided to reduce machinery costs on his 725-acre corn and soybean farm in west central Illinois, he was convinced to move to no-till farming.
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Retaining High Strip-Till Yield by Protecting Variable Soils

Achieving 80-plus bushel soybeans and 260-plus bushel corn isn’t an accident for Illinois strip-tiller John Potter who leverages cover crops, timely fertilizer applications and a strategic equipment mix to succeed solo on 1,250 acres.
John Potter was looking for a way to reduce labor on his west central Illinois farm when he decided to become a strip-tiller nearly 20 years ago.
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