Items Tagged with 'Ohio State University'

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[Podcast] Crunching the Numbers on Progressive Precision Farming Payback

In this episode of the <em>Strip-Till Farmer</em> podcast, brought to you by NovAtel, John Fulton, biological engineering professor at Ohio State University, analyzes the current adoption rates of precision technology on North American farms, along with the greatest potential to expand application of farm data to improve on-farm management and decision making.
In this episode of the Strip-Till Farmer podcast, brought to you by NovAtel, John Fulton, biological engineering professor at Ohio State University, analyzes the current adoption rates of precision technology on North American farms, along with the greatest potential to expand application of farm data to improve on-farm management and decision making.
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Videos Detail Threat Of Soybean Rust And Ways To Minimize Potential Losses

Growers will find key information to keep in mind about the ongoing threat of soybean rust and actions they can take to minimize potential losses from this disease in two videos now available online. The videos include highlights from numerous research and Extension projects carried out by land-grant university researchers from around the country involved in soybean rust research and monitoring efforts.
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Maximizing Nitrogen Uptake In Soybeans

After talking with many farmers throughout Ohio during this year’s Extension meetings, one common question keeps popping up: What about nitrogen application to soybean? Yes, soybean plants have high nitrogen requirements due to the high protein content of grain. On average, approximately 4 pounds of nitrogen is removed per bushel of grain. (Corn only removes approximately 1 pound of nitrogen per bushel of grain.) Soybean nitrogen requirements are met through both nitrogen-fixing bacteria (Bradyrhizobia) and residual/mineralized soil nitrogen.
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Herbicide Update For 2014 Crops

Below are brief descriptions of herbicides introduced over the past year or so. As readers are undoubtedly aware, there is currently almost no development of new active ingredients. Most of the products mentioned here are premixes of existing herbicides. Some of these seem to have a fit for Ohio situations while others do not. A brief Powerpoint video on this is covered here: http://agcrops.osu.edu/specialists/weeds.
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