Ian Gronau

Ian Gronau

Ian Gronau is a Contributing Editor for Lessiter Publications, with primary support responsibilities for Precision Farming Dealer, Strip-Till Strategies and the Strip-Till Farmer Website. He is a graduate of Chicago’s Columbia College and has been preparing content for magazines, websites and newspapers since 2009, and has been recognized with several awards.

ARTICLES

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4 Strip-Till Supporting Principles of Soil Health

Ohio soil scientist, Frank Gibbs, shares his essential strategies for boosting soil health in a strip-till system — from increasing earthworm populations to keeping soil “alive” all year long.
Intentionally or not, farmers who’ve taken up strip-tilling have already made a commitment to rebuilding soil health. According to Rawson, Ohio, soil health expert Frank Gibbs, by being a bit more deliberate, strip-tillers can magnify the impact of their conservation efforts in ways that will show up on their bottom line.
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Playing the Percentages with Precision Investments in Strip-Till

Cutting fuel usage by 40%, saving $5,000 in seed costs while only tilling 30% of his fields provide tangible return on investment with technology for Mark Richards.
Dresden, Ontario strip-tiller, Mark Richards, considers himself a “bleeding-edge” farmer in terms of adopting new strategies and precision equipment. His adoption and adaptation of technology has made his 3,000-acre corn, soybean, sugarbeet, wheat and tomato operation significantly more efficient, productive and profitable.
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Managing Inputs to Boost Soil Health in a Strip-Till System

Continuous experimentation with nutrient application methods, products and timing has contributed to Kansas strip-tiller Josh Koehn consistently achieving 300-bushel corn.
Montezuma, Kan., farmer Josh Koehn says attention to detail is really what’s made the difference on his 10,000 acre farm. Feeling the need to manage residue better and build healthier soils, he switched from full tillage to strip-till back in 2008 on most of his 30% irrigated and 70% dryland operation.
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Wallendal

4 Ways to Supercharge Strip-Till with Certified Organic Acres

With 550 acres of certified organic farmland and 200 more in transition, Wisconsin farmer Megan Wallendal shares tips on making the most of strip-tilled organic crops.
Often, it’s the allure of operation-wide cost reduction that convinces farmers to transition into strip-tilling. But, on Wallendal Farms, strip-tilling since 1985, they’ve found a way to push revenues in addition to enjoying the efficiencies.
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5 Tips for Strip-Tilled Sugarbeet Success

Strip-tilling sugarbeets by trial and error since 2014 has taught Michigan farmer Ryan Shaw how the practice can result in input reductions and cost savings.
"You can’t strip-till sugarbeets," is something Snover, Mich., farmer Ryan Shaw had grown accustomed to hearing. But, since introducing strip-till on his 1,400-acre corn, soybean and sugarbeet operation in 2014, a glance at his fields provides evidence to the contrary.
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Justifying a Switch to Strip-Tilling with Early Progress & Profit

Illinois farmer sees roughly $45 per-acre savings and an up to 20-bushel yield advantage on marginal soils with a transition to strip-tilling.
For the past 6 years, Seth Wenzel and his father, Brian, have been transitioning to strip-tilled corn on their 4,000-acre farm near Kent, in northwest Illinois. Wenzel maintains a consistent corn and soybean rotation with approximately two-thirds of his acreage planted with corn annually.
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Kerry Knuth

6 Strip-Till Adjustments for Ideal Berm-Building

Close scrutiny of soil structure and constant equipment evaluations has led Mead, Neb., farmer Kerry Knuth to be more effective, economical and efficient with strip-till.
Mead, Neb., farmer Kerry Knuth, made the transition from dragging a disc ripper and mulch finisher across his 2,200-acre corn and soybeans operation to strip-tillage back in 2005. Though a “set it and forget it,” philosophy works on some farms, Knuth quickly determined that building an ideal berm required adaptation and experimentation to accommodate ever-changing field conditions. 
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